thelovelyseas:


Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, Bahamas by David Hall
thelovelyseas:


Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, Bahamas by David Hall

thelovelyseas:

Tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, Bahamas by David Hall

hunnessy:

stacksbreadup:

#TransformationTuesday

raw

hunnessy:

stacksbreadup:

#TransformationTuesday

raw

lifeunderthewaves:

On the Hunt by christianloader White-Tip Reef Sharks on the hunt amongst a school of Big-Eye Trevally.

Sipadan Island, Sabah, Malaysia.

lifeunderthewaves:

Lyna & the Fish of Bora Bora by jnhPhoto Using the Nikon 1 AW1 half submerged

lifeunderthewaves:

Coolest tako on the reef by BrandonTerry1

lifeunderthewaves:

West Oz by Surfphoto Alan Stokes in Western Australia.

lifeunderthewaves:

In The Morning Sunlight by godive2000

lifeunderthewaves:

Two As One - Bunaken Island, Indonesia by jimpattersonphotography While SCUBA diving in Indonesia, I photographed this split view of a shallow reef off Bunaken Island in the North Sulawesi Sea and the volcanic island of Manado Tua.

lifeunderthewaves:

Session remembrance by dimimaroulakis View behind the glass of my freediving mask, noon time, I stopped for a while to let the sun warm my body before my dive..

fuckyeahaquaria:

Megamouth Shark | Megachasma pelagios

"The megamouth shark is considered to be one of the most rare forms of sharks out there. They aren’t often seen by people and that can lead one to wonder if they have decent numbers or not. Only 54 of them have been seen and documented with only 3 of them captured on film.

They weren’t discovered until 1975 when a navy ship accidentally found one caught up in their anchor. Yet it wasn’t until 1983 that it was proven to actually exist. In fact, since the early sighting it was rumored to be just a hoax by the military in an effort to gain attention.

The future of the megamouth shark remains mystifying. Since we don’t really know how many of them exist it is extremely difficult to calculate how many of them there are. Scientists believe they have healthy numbers though and that they are quite versatile so they can easily survive. More research has to be done but finding these sharks can prove to be difficult.” -  

(Photo by OurBreathingPlanet)

fuckyeahaquaria:

Caribbean Reef Sharks | Carcharhinus perezi

This species is commonly observed laying on the bottom in caves and under ledges, often in an apparent torpor as if sleeping. They have been called the sleeping shark, although there is no evidence that it is actually asleep when resting.

These sharks have and uses six keen senses; olfactory, visual, tactile ( including vibration sensitivity through a lateralis canal system), auditory, gustatory, and electric reception. The Caribbean reef shark is especially adapted to detecting low frequency sounds (indicative of a struggling fish nearby).” -

(by alfonsator)